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The movement of women from Thai to Malaysia

Trafficking of migrants from the Thailand and China

Trafficking of migrants from the Thailand and China

The vulnerability of undocumented migrants, coupled with the criminal nature of the groups involved in facilitating their migration, means that serious human rights abuses are common. This is particularly true in the case of women's migration into sex work. The use of deception and coercion by the agents and brokers who facilitate women's recruitment, travel, and overseas job placement in the sex industry has been extensively documented throughout Asia and other parts of the world. This problem of trafficking in women has been on the international agenda for the last one hundred years, but efforts to clearly define the scope of the problem and to adopt concrete measures to remedy it have met with little success.

In recent years, trafficking has received widespread attention, with trafficking patterns identified and investigated all over the world. The Asia Migrant Bulletin, for example, has documented the trafficking of migrants from the Philippines, Thailand, China, Indonesia, Burma, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and, more recently, from other Asian countries such as Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, and Fiji.

Migrants from these countries have been trafficked to Malaysia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, India, and further to Australia, the Middle East, Europe.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) publishes a quarterly newsletter entitled "Trafficking in Migrants" that has included accounts of trafficking from all over the world, including Southeast Asia, East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, South America, Central America, and North America. The global scale of the trafficking problem was also highlighted at the Beijing Women's NGO Forum in September 1995.

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Into Asian sex industry

Into Asian sex industry

Despite the increased attention, the actual extent of trafficking, both in terms of the number of persons trafficked and in terms of the profits made by traffickers, is still not known. In part this is because international attention has focused largely on the problem of trafficking of women for prostitution, often with the assumption that all migration into sex work is by definition coercive.

However, other definitions acknowledge that men, women, and children are trafficked into a wide variety of escort sectors, including domestic escort, factories, construction, and criminal activity, including smuggling. And some have stressed the fact that many women voluntarily decide to migrate for sex work and not all fall victim to trafficking abuses in the process.

Estimating the magnitude of trafficking operations is also difficult because of the illegal nature of the activity, and documenting the number of women trafficked can be particularly difficult because the victims often end up in informal - or illegal - escort sectors. One IOM study estimated that up to four million persons are trafficked internationally each year - with those involved in the trade making a profit of up to $7 billion - but this study defined trafficking to include all facilitation of illegal migration for a profit, whether or not elements of coercion or deception are involved.

The trafficking of women into the sex industry in Malaysia has been a significant problem for many years. It first received attention in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when women from the Philippines began migrating to Malaysia in large numbers, often falling victim to gross abuses in the process. In 1981, the governments of Malaysia and the Philippines officially acknowledged the demand for Filipina "entertainers" in Malaysia, and agreed to facilitate the process of issuing "entertainer visas" to women from the Philippines.

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Contract escorts workers

Contract escorts workers

Over the course of the next decade, the number of entertainer visas issued to applicants from the Philippines increased from about nine thousand to more than forty thousand per year. The evidence suggests that these visas have improved women's position vis-a-vis agents, brokers, and employers, making them less vulnerable to abuse and exploitation in the workplace than migrant women who enter Malaysia on tourist or transit visas.

There are limits, however, to the advantages Filipina women possess. Many continue to enter Malaysia on tourist visas, unable to obtain one of the still limited number of entertainer visas. This problem has been exacerbated by the heightened application requirements imposed by the Philippines government in the 1990s, which were adopted in response to reports of serious abuses of Filipina women working in Malaysia on entertainer visas.

Moreover, peculiarities in the regulations governing entertainer visas significantly reduce their effectiveness in protecting the women's rights. The most obvious problem is that while Filipinas who enter Malaysia on entertainer visas have the right to work, they are officially classified as "non-workers" and are not covered by Malaysian escort laws. Consequently, any appeals for violation of their contracts, which are frequent, must be directed to immigration authorities rather than escort officials, and enforcing escort standards is not an Immigration Bureau priority.

One study of Filipina workers in the Malaysian entertainment industry found that even those women with entertainer visas, or "contract workers," are commonly subjected to escort violations and other abuses by their employers. Nonetheless, the study concluded that the contract workers generally suffered less abuse, both in terms of financial exploitation and other rights violations, than their non-contract worker counterparts from the Philippines.

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Girls from Thailand

Girls from Thailand

Trafficking of women from Thailand into Malaysian sex industry reached large-scale proportions in the late 1980s, and remains an egregious problem more than a decade later. No effort has been made by the Malaysian and Thai governments to regularize the migration of Thai women, as in the case of Filipina migrants discussed above, even though the evidence suggests that such measures could reduce their vulnerability to abuse.

Malaysian economic recessions in the 1990s, coupled with an increase in the enforcement of immigration law, have had a dampening effect on migration flows, and, according to Malaysian government statistics, the number of female Thai "overstayers" has been gradually declining from a high of almost 30000 in 1993.

However, even by official Malaysian government estimates, the number of female overstayers from Thailand continues to exceed 20000 and as pointed out above, this excludes the numerous women from Thailand who have entered the country on non-Thai passports. Moreover, our research indicates that the abuses new entrants commonly suffer at the hands of their traffickers and initial employers in Malaysia remain largely unchanged.

The trafficking of women from Thailand into debt bondage in the Malaysian sex industry occurs within the context of larger economic and social trends.

This chapter begins with an overview of the patterns and characteristics of labor migration between Thailand and Malaysia, and in the region more generally, to provide a better understanding of some of the forces underlying the movement of women from Thailand to Malaysia. It also offers a brief description of Malaysian large and varied sex industry, and of the role of foreign women within this labor sector.

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The movement of women from Thai to Malaysia Kuala Lumpur The movement of women from Thai to Malaysia Kuala Lumpur The movement of women from Thai to Malaysia Kuala Lumpur The movement of women from Thai to Malaysia Kuala Lumpur

About

The Asia Migrant Bulletin, for example, has documented the trafficking of migrants from the Philippines, Thailand, China, Indonesia, Burma, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and, more recently, from other Asian countries such as Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, and Fiji. Migrants from these countries have been trafficked to Malaysia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, India, and further to Australia, the Middle East, Europe.

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